Posts

Showing posts from August, 2013

Hormone Receptors in Advanced Breast Cancer

The hormones in your body that controlled the growth of your hips as a teen, your monthly period, and even hot flashes can play a role in breast cancer.   That's because some breast cancer cells have a sort of biological on-off switch, called a hormone receptor. Two female hormones can flip these switches "on" and quicken the cancer cells' growth. They are estrogen and progesterone.  Tests can show if your cancer has hormone receptors. For advanced breast cancer, your doctor may want to repeat these tests after a while to see if your cancer has changed. It may respond differently to hormones than before. Test results will help your doctor find the best treatment at any stage. HR-Positive Cancer Is Common About 2 out of 3 breast cancers have hormone receptors. They're more common in older than younger women. Compared with other types of breast cancer, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancers, called HR-positive cancers, tend to: Grow more slowlyRespond better to h…

Multiple Myeloma

Multiple myeloma is a blood disorder related to lymphoma and leukemia, because it usually arises in the bone marrow. There is no cure for multiple myeloma, but treatments are available that slow its progression.

What Is Multiple Myeloma? In multiple myeloma, a certain kind of white blood cell called a plasma cell begins to multiply abnormally within the bone marrow. Normally, plasma cells are responsible for producing antibodies that help fight infections. In multiple myeloma, however, excessive plasma cells release unhealthy levels of protein (called immunoglobulin) into the bones and blood. The excessive protein accumulates throughout the body, causing organ damage.  The plasma cells also cause problems inside bones, where they multiply and crowd out normal blood cells. Inside the bone marrow, multiple myeloma plasma cells release chemicals that prompt the body to dissolve areas of bone. This creates weak areas of bone, which are called lytic lesions. As multiple myeloma progresses,…

General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

Image
Chronic myelogenous leukemia is a disease in which the bone marrow makes too many white blood cells. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (also called CML or chronic granulocytic leukemia) is a slowly progressing blood and bone marrow disease that usually occurs during or after middle age, and rarely occurs in children. Normally, the bone marrow makes bloodstem cells (immature cells) that develop into mature blood cells over time. A blood stem cell may become a myeloid stem cell or a lymphoid stem cell. The lymphoid stem cell develops into a white blood cell. The myeloid stem cell develops into one of three types of mature blood cells: Red blood cells that carry oxygen and other materials to all tissues of the body.Platelets that help prevent bleeding by causing blood clots to form.Granulocytes (white blood cells) that fight infection and disease Blood cell development. A blood stem cell goes through several steps to become a red blood cell, platelet, or white blood cell. In CML, too many bloo…

Living With Insomnia: Get a Good Night's Sleep

Image
A Few Bad Nights or Insomnia? Have you been tossing and turning at night? Perhaps you're having trouble falling asleep because you're lying in bed worrying about work and finances. Or, you wake up in the middle of the night and can't fall back asleep. Or, you wake up feeling more tired, not refreshed, in the morning and are excessively tired during the day. You're certainly not alone if you're suffering from any of these symptoms of insomnia. More than 25 percent of Americans report insomnia occasionally, while 10% experience insomnia almost every night, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). So, how do you tell if you've simply hit a rough patch that will pass, or if you have a chronic sleep problem? There isn't a hard number, says Tracey Marks, MD, psychiatrist in Atlanta and author ofMaster Your Sleep. A good marker is to look at a week or month and add up whether you've had trouble sleeping more nights than not. Acute in…

Teeth Whitening

Many teeth whitening systems and products are available, including whitening toothpastes, over-the-counter gels, rinses, strips, trays, and whitening products obtained from a dentist. Teeth whitening is ideal for people who have healthy, unrestored teeth (no fillings) and gums. Individuals with yellow tones to their teeth respond best. But this cosmetic procedure is not recommended for everyone. Find out if teeth whitening is right for you. Whitening SystemsWhitening Toothpastes All toothpastes help remove surface stains, because they contain mild abrasives. Some whitening toothpastes contain gentle polishing or chemical agents that provide additional stain removal effectiveness. Whitening toothpastes can help remove surface stains only and do not contain bleach; over-the-counter and professional whitening products contain carbamide peroxide or hydrogen peroxide that helps lighten the color deep in the tooth. Whitening toothpastes can lighten the tooth's color by about one shade.…

Low-Carb Diets Can Cause Bad Breath

Image
Low-carb lifestyle junkies are more likely to suffer from a seldom discussed side effect of such diets -- halitosis, aka bad breath. And since more than 25 million people say they have tried the Atkins diet (not to mention other low-carb eating plans), according to the National Marketing Institute, bad breath may be an epidemic!
Bad breath in the low/no-carb sect is often caused by certain chemicals that are released in the breath as the body burns fat. They are called ketones, and entering into a fat-burning state of ketosis is the hallmark of the Atkins diet. So the good news is that if your breath stinks, you're probably doing a good job of sticking to that low-carb diet.
"Carbohydrates aren't readily available, so you start to use other fats and proteins as your source of energy, and as a result you are going to get a breath problem," explains Kenneth Burrell, DDS, the senior director of the council on scientific affairs of the American Dental Association. Pass …

Dental Health and Bad Breath

Bad breath, medically called halitosis, can result from poor dental health habits and may be a sign of other health problems. Bad breath can also be made worse by the types of foods you eat and other unhealthy lifestyle habits. How Does What You Eat Affect Breath? Basically, all the food eaten begins to be broken down in your mouth. As foods are digested and absorbed into the bloodstream, they are eventually carried to your lungs and given off in your breath. If you eat foods with strong odors (such as garlic or onions), brushing and flossing -- even mouthwash -- merely covers up the odor temporarily. The odor will not go away completely until the foods have passed through your body. Why Do Poor Habits Cause Bad Breath? If you don't brush and floss teeth daily, food particles can remain in your mouth, which promotes bacterial growth between teeth, around the gums, and on thetongue. This causes bad breath. Antibacterial mouth rinses can also help reduce bacteria. In addition, odor-…